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Review: Corum Admiral's Cup Tides 48

by Marco 19 February, 2008 View Comments

This week we'll be looking at the Admiral's Cup Tides 48mm, a sporty, stylish, and bold watch from Corum.

admirals cup tides 48

Outside

The first thing that struck me when we received this watch is the look. Although this watch is everything but subtle, it is various subtle details that give it its character. The first thing that I picked up on is that the markers are graduated in minutes and not the usual hour markers. I later learnt that this is because the flags that are painted on the inner bezel represent the numbers one to twelve using nautical pennants. This brings me to one of the major differences between the new Admiral Cup collection and the previous versions. The flags are much less evident. Although some die-hard sailing fans might resent this, I think it makes the overall look of the dial much more attractive. An other nice touch is that the thick sapphire crystal is faceted. This means that instead of the usual circular shape, the crystal's shape actually mirrors the dodecagonal shape of the bezel making for a congruous aesthetic.

admirals cup tides 48admirals cup tides 48

The size of the Tides is also evident. The case is 48mm wide not including the crown, which is well protected by rubber shoulders. The thickness of the case is well above average, which may be daunting to some, but is exactly what this watch needs to have a balanced, bold look. One of the main design themes for this watch is rubber. Both the bezel and case-back are fused with it, meaning that underneath the layer of black rubber, still lies solid 18K pink gold or titanium.

Inside

The mechanics of the Tides is definitely its most unique feature. The watch runs on an automatic Corum CO277 caliber movement, which was developed and built exclusively for Corum by Dubois Depraz in Switzerland. The mechanism can calculate the strength, height, and time of the tide, and the strength of the current for nearly every location on Earth that experiences tidal phenomena. To develop these functions Corum worked with the Astronomic Observatory of Geneva and the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Services of the French National Navy (SHOM) at Brest, France. It took three years to develop the mechanism. The watch also keeps track of the moon phases, as the moon is the most important factor in the tidal process.

Overall the Corum Admiral's Cup Tides has everything one would need in a luxury sports watch. It is encased in a durable, water resistant case, rugged enough for even the do-it-yourself sailors. The watch is powered by a prestigious and exclusive Swiss automatic movement. Finally the style of the watch will definitely turn heads and fits comfortably on the wrist regardless of its 48mm diameter.

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